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Wayland Weekly Flower

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Sudbury-Wayland-Lincoln Domestic Violence Roundtable

Sudbury-Wayland-Lincoln Domestic Violence Roundtable is an all-volunteer nonprofit organization of men and women incorporated in 1999. The goal of the Roundtable is to raise awareness about the issue of domestic violence through community education and networking and to improve the coordination between public and private services for victims and families touched by domestic violence.

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Wayland Weekly Flower – Lily and Larkspur Bouquet

A bouquet of Rose and Spider Gerbera daisy (also called Fringe Gerbera daisy) with Hypericum Berry greenery arranged by Theresa C.H. Kuo for the Council on Aging (COA) center in the Wayland Town Building. Theresa periodically provides flower arrangements to share the beauty of flowers with fellow attendees of COA events and programs.

A bouquet of Oriental Lilies, Triumph Tulips, and Larkspur at the Carriage House at Lee’s Farm along Route 20 in Wayland.  Carriage House is a senior living facility with a 24 hour staff.  It provides scheduled transportation, meals, and activities for independent minded seniors, as well as extra help for those who need a little more care.

The Oriental Lily (genus Lilium) is a stunning highly fragrant flower with good cut flower vase life.   It is a great choice to add rich color and fragrance to any bouquet.  True lilies grow from a bulb with scales on the exterior and no protective skin.  The Oriental Lily and Asiatic Lily are true lilies; where as, the popular Daylily is not a true lily.   The Asiatic Lily is one of the easiest to grow true lilies.  It is available in a wide variety of colors, but most Asiatic Lilies are unscented.

Larkspur, a common name for the genus Delphinium, belongs to the buttercup flower family.  Blue Larkspur is used in this bouquet, but the blooms are available in colors from white to blue to violet.  They are a great choice for adding a mild fragrance and color to a bouquet, but they are a fragile flower with relatively short vase life.

The Triumph Tulip, a cross between a Single Early and a Darwin tulip, is known for its classic cup like shape.  It has good vase life and is a hardy plant which is able to withstand colder temperatures.  However, like any tulip, it is a favorite of rabbits and deer.

Return here every week to warm up to a picture of flowers from somewhere in Wayland.  Perhaps learn a bit about flowers, and different places in Wayland.

Submitted by Duane Galbi

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