Links

  • Weekly Newsletter
  • Yard Sale
  • News
  • Town Events
  • Philanthropy & Fundraising
  • Volunteering
  • Announcements
  • Lost & Found
Disclosure: Waylandenews Executive Director Kim Reichelt is a member of the Wayland School Committee
Non-Profit Spotlight:
Sudbury-Wayland-Lincoln Domestic Violence Roundtable

Sudbury-Wayland-Lincoln Domestic Violence Roundtable is an all-volunteer nonprofit organization of men and women incorporated in 1999. The goal of the Roundtable is to raise awareness about the issue of domestic violence through community education and networking and to improve the coordination between public and private services for victims and families touched by domestic violence.

On the web here

Categories

Archives

Advanced Search

Wayland Weekly Flower – Blooming Pink Crabapple

A beautiful pink flowering crabapple along River Road.  If planted in an area where fruit cleanup is not an issue, the crabapple is a wonderful tree.  They are adaptable hardy trees that like sun, but can handle a little shade.  They provide spectacular flowers in the spring and food for wildlife in the winter.  They are a medium sized tree with a 50 plus year lifespan.

Crabapples, pears, and cherries are all members of the Rosaceae (rose) family.  One way to distinguish them is to look at the bark.  The bark of a cherry tree tends to have horizontal fissures; whereas, the bark of pear and crabapple trees have vertical fissures.   A pear tree has a white flower, so a pink flower could be a cherry or crabapple tree.  Looking more closely at the flower, one can see a difference between a cherry and a crabapple tree.  The flower of a cherry tree has a single style and its associated stigma to collect the pollen.  The crabapple flower, like the apple flower, has multiple styles leading down to the flower ovary.

Return here every week to warm up to a picture of flowers from somewhere in Wayland.  Perhaps learn a bit about flowers, and different places in Wayland.  If you see noteworthy flowers in Wayland, please contact the author at waylandweeklyflower@gmail.com

Submitted by Duane Galbi

Wayland Weekly Flower – Forsythia and Azalea

A stunning purple azalea framed against a cluster of forsythia growing at a house on Morrill Drive.   Forsythia, a member of the olive family (Oleacea), is the true harbinger of spring.  At this time, the forsythia is at full bloom in Wayland.  It is a spectacular time to take a walk or drive around Wayland to enjoy forsythia’s golden yellow burst as the memories of winter fade away.

Azalea bushes are early flowering members of the rhododendron family (Ericaceae).  One big different between the rhododendron and azalea is that azalea’s loose their leaves.  Both evergreen and deciduous varieties of azaleas exist; whereas, rhododendrons are always evergreen.  Evergreen azaleas actually produce two sets of leaves, one in the spring and one in the fall and there is an often unnoticeable transition between the sets of leaves.  In general, an evergreen azalea bush is smaller in height and has smaller leaves than its rhododendron relatives.  A deciduous azalea is larger with a mature height of 8-15 feet.  Most azaleas in this area are the evergreen variety.

With effort, both azalea and forsythia can be pruned to form hedges of various sizes and shapes.  However, both these plants naturally have a rounded shape.  Pruning into box shaped hedges tends to reduce their spring time brilliance.  Like most spring time flowering shrubs, both azalea and forsythia bloom on previous year’s growth, so the best time to prune the plants is right after the blooms fade.  Pruning later in the summer or fall will remove the forming blooms and reduce the following spring time flowering.

Return here every week to warm up to a picture of flowers from somewhere in Wayland.  Perhaps learn a bit about flowers, and different places in Wayland.  If you see noteworthy flowers in Wayland, please contact the author at waylandweeklyflower@gmail.com

Submitted by Duane Galbi

Wayland Weekly Flower – Garden Daffodil

A cluster of Daffodils growing at a house on Stonebridge Rd.

The Daffodil (genus Narcissus) is a hardy classic spring time perennial.   It is native to southern Europe and North Africa, but the plant has been spread widely since before the 10th century.  The Daffodil flower has six tepals (petals), which are white in this picture, surrounding a central corona, which is yellow in this picture.   The petals and the corona are often the same color with yellow being the most common color.

Daffodil plants can last many years as the bulbs are not attractive to deer or rodents.  The most common pests are slugs and bulb rot.  Although the flower produces small black seeds, these take years to generate flowers.  The most common way to spread the plant is by bulb division.  The bulbs have contractile roots which shorten after some years to pull the bulbs deeper into the ground.

Daffodil stems secrete a fluid which promotes the wilting of other flowers.  When cut, the stems should be soaked and rinsed before adding them to an arrangement or they should be featured alone.

Return here every week to warm up to a picture of flowers from somewhere in Wayland.  Perhaps learn a bit about flowers, and different places in Wayland.  If you see noteworthy flowers in Wayland, please contact the author at waylandweeklyflower@gmail.com

Submitted by Duane Galbi

Wayland Weekly Flower – Potted Pansies

A pot of pansies along Stonebridge Rd near Route 126.

The pansy is a classic spring time flower which can be purchased at most garden nurseries.  The pansy is native to the southern hemisphere.  However, the plants bought at nurseries are typically F1 pansy hybrids of the genuses Viola and Wittrockiana.  Nursery grown pansies come is a wide variety of colors and are typically grown in a greenhouse from seed.  When purchased, they are three to four months old.  To extend the flowering life of the plant, one should deadhead spent flowers, and cut back leggy plants to revitalize the plant.

Although pansies are perennials, they can not handle the extremes of our weather and are typically treated like spring time annuals.  Although pansies like sun, planting in an area with afternoon shade can also extend the flowering life of the plant.  Afternoon shade protects the plant from our summer sun, and hence can extend the time before the plant inevitably succumbs to the summer heat.

Return here every week to warm up to a picture of flowers from somewhere in Wayland.  Perhaps learn a bit about flowers, and different places in Wayland.  If you see noteworthy flowers in Wayland, please contact the author at waylandweeklyflower@gmail.com

Submitted by Duane Galbi

Wayland Weekly Flower – Forsythia Wreath

A wreath of Forsythia from 396 Old Connecticut Path (Route 126) in Wayland.   The location is just south of where the Hultman Aqueduct crosses Route 126.  Forsythia is the true harbinger of spring and it flowers before any of its leaf foliage emerges.

If you believe it is still a little too early for the Forsythia to bloom you are correct. This wreath is actually a nice imitation made of plastic flowers.  Although the residents of this location have some of the oldest and nicest Forsythia in town, they like to get a few weeks jump on spring by first putting out imitation Forsythia.  Return back to Wayland weekly flowers in a few weeks for a picture of the real golden Forsythia blooms at this location.

Forsythia is genus name of a group of flowering trees which are members of the olive family (Oleacea).   Another, lesser used, common name for Forsythia is the Easter Tree.  Although a very hungry deer will eat almost any vegetation, Forsythia is generally thought of as deer resistant.

Return here every week to warm up to a picture of flowers from somewhere in Wayland.  Perhaps learn a bit about flowers, and different places in Wayland.  If you see note worthy flowers in Wayland, please contact the author at waylandweeklyflower@gmail.com

Submitted by Duane Galbi

Wayland Weekly Flower – Green Carnation Bouquet

A St. Patrick’s Day bouquet, featuring green carnations (Dianthus Caryophyllus), from Donelan’s Supermarket in Wayland.  The bouquet was imported from Columbia which is the world’s leading producer of carnations.

The green carnation was created by selectively breeding.  White carnations can be dyed green by putting them in water containing food coloring.  I expect this carnation is a natural one because of its light green color. Natural carnations are light green; whereas, dyed carnations are typically deep or dark green.   

According to mythology, carnations appeared from the tears of the Virgin Mary when Christ was crucified, and they are important to St Patrick’s day because its roots are an Irish Catholic holiday celebrating their patron Saint.  The original color associated with the holiday was blue, but by around 1900, the holiday’s color had switched to green.  The green stripe in the Irish flag which traditionally represents the Catholics of Ireland and the “Emerald Island” nickname for Ireland are thought to have driven the change.  The Irish flag is a tri-color flag.  The green stripe is thought to represents the Catholics of Ireland, the orange stripe to represent the Protestants, and white middle stripe to represent the peace between these two religions.

The flowers on the right side of the bouquet are white Alstroemeria flowers (common name Peruvian lily).  Alstroemeria flower, like carnations, have good vase life; however, they have little to no fragrance.

The flower on the lower left, near the carnation, is a green spider chrysanthemum.  It is part of the daisy family of plants which includes zinnias and marigolds. This flower also has good vase life and adds a distinctive touch to the arrangement.

Return here every week to warm up to a picture of flowers from somewhere in Wayland.  Perhaps learn a bit about flowers, and different places in Wayland. 

Submitted by Duane Galbi

Wayland Weekly Flower – Celebration Boutonniere

A UPS Forever Stamp with a picture of a “Celebration Boutonniere” taken at the Wayland Post Office on Route 20.  This post office was built in 1970 during the Nixon Administration and serves northern and central Wayland.   There is a second Wayland post office located in Cochituate.

Boutonnieres are traditionally worn by men at weddings or other special occasions.   In the 1900’s, the Boutonniere, or just a simple single buttonhole flower, was an indispensable part of a sophisticated, well-dressed men’s wardrobe.  They are most often pinned to the lapel of a suite or a formal jacket.

The main flower of this Boutonniere is not a rose but rather a Ranunculus (common name Persian ButterCup).  The green buds are Berzelia buds which traditionally grow into small white flowers, and the greenery filler is clubmoss.

Return here every week to warm up to a picture of flowers from somewhere in Wayland.  Perhaps learn a bit about flowers, and different places in Wayland.