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Disclosure: Waylandenews Executive Director Kim Reichelt is a member of the Wayland School Committee

Wayland Weekly Flower

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Sudbury-Wayland-Lincoln Domestic Violence Roundtable

Sudbury-Wayland-Lincoln Domestic Violence Roundtable is an all-volunteer nonprofit organization of men and women incorporated in 1999. The goal of the Roundtable is to raise awareness about the issue of domestic violence through community education and networking and to improve the coordination between public and private services for victims and families touched by domestic violence.

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Wayland Weekly Flower – Lily and Larkspur Bouquet

A bouquet of Rose and Spider Gerbera daisy (also called Fringe Gerbera daisy) with Hypericum Berry greenery arranged by Theresa C.H. Kuo for the Council on Aging (COA) center in the Wayland Town Building. Theresa periodically provides flower arrangements to share the beauty of flowers with fellow attendees of COA events and programs.

A bouquet of Oriental Lilies, Triumph Tulips, and Larkspur at the Carriage House at Lee’s Farm along Route 20 in Wayland.  Carriage House is a senior living facility with a 24 hour staff.  It provides scheduled transportation, meals, and activities for independent minded seniors, as well as extra help for those who need a little more care.

The Oriental Lily (genus Lilium) is a stunning highly fragrant flower with good cut flower vase life.   It is a great choice to add rich color and fragrance to any bouquet.  True lilies grow from a bulb with scales on the exterior and no protective skin.  The Oriental Lily and Asiatic Lily are true lilies; where as, the popular Daylily is not a true lily.   The Asiatic Lily is one of the easiest to grow true lilies.  It is available in a wide variety of colors, but most Asiatic Lilies are unscented.

Larkspur, a common name for the genus Delphinium, belongs to the buttercup flower family.  Blue Larkspur is used in this bouquet, but the blooms are available in colors from white to blue to violet.  They are a great choice for adding a mild fragrance and color to a bouquet, but they are a fragile flower with relatively short vase life.

The Triumph Tulip, a cross between a Single Early and a Darwin tulip, is known for its classic cup like shape.  It has good vase life and is a hardy plant which is able to withstand colder temperatures.  However, like any tulip, it is a favorite of rabbits and deer.

Return here every week to warm up to a picture of flowers from somewhere in Wayland.  Perhaps learn a bit about flowers, and different places in Wayland.

Submitted by Duane Galbi

Wayland Weekly Flower – Rose and Gerbera Daisy Bouquet

A bouquet of Rose and Spider Gerbera daisy (also called Fringe Gerbera daisy) with Hypericum Berry greenery arranged by Theresa C.H. Kuo for the Council on Aging (COA) center in the Wayland Town Building.  Theresa periodically provides flower arrangements to share the beauty of flowers with fellow attendees of COA events and programs.

The Gerbera daisy is the fifth most popular cut flower in the world, and the Netherlands produce almost 900 million of these flowers per year.  The Gerbera daisy comes in all the colors of the rainbow except blue, and is really a tight cluster of many different blossoms of different sizes.  The daisy belongs to the Asteraceae family, the same family as sunflowers.  Live daisies, like sunflowers, follow the sun as it moves across the sky.  Cut daisies have excellent vase life and typically last nearly two weeks.

Hypericum greeny comes from the Hypericum shrub which is a hardy shrub that can grown in the Wayland area.  It flowers in the spring and forms a berry by the fall.  The resulting berry can have different colors depending on the plant type and is mildly poisonous.  The plant itself is often considered an invasive weed, and it can take over and dominate the landscape.

Return here every week to warm up to a picture of flowers from somewhere in Wayland.  Perhaps learn a bit about flowers, and different places in Wayland.

Submitted by Duane Galbi

Wayland Weekly Flower – Mixed Color Rose Bouquet

Mixed Color Rose Bouquet (genus Rosa – probably Hybrid tea) with Baby’s Breath highlights from Donelan’s Supermarket in Wayland.  There is symbolism associated with each rose color.  A white rose is often referred to as the bridal rose and signifies young love, truth, and loyalty.  A yellow rose signifies friendship, joy, and caring; whereas, a pink rose can symbolize admiration or appreciation.  Mixed color bouquets do not send a mixed message, but rather have a more complex meaning by combining the symbolism of multiple colors.

The key to making cut flowers last is to keep them cold (35’ish degrees) so they remain dormant until they are sold.  To keep flowers fresh after purchasing, keep them in a cool place.  Flower food is formulated to help flowers last.  It treats the water by adding nutrients (ie sugar) , making the water slightly acidic (helps water move up the stem), and adding an anti-bacterial agent.  Adding aspirin to the water only helps make the water slightly acidic.  A better choice would be apple cider vinegar (acidic and anti-bacterial) and sugar.   Changing the water every few days helps control the bacteria in the vase and extends the longevity of the flowers.  Just remember to treat the water every time you change it.  If you have flower food, save some to use when you change the water.

Return here every week to warm up to a picture of flowers from somewhere in Wayland.  Perhaps learn a bit about flowers, and different places in Wayland.

Submitted by Duane Galbi

Wayland Weekly Flower: Red Roses

Red Roses (genus Rosa – probably Hybrid tea) from Post Road Flowers across from the Wayland Post Office.  About 650 million roses are sold in the U.S. every year with 95% of the roses imported from Columbia and Ecuador by being flown into Miami.  Nearly 70% of the 200 million roses produced for the U.S. Valentines Day are red.  Since Greek and Roman times, the red rose has been the ultimate symbol of romantic love.  A dozen or two red roses is always a great gift for that special someone.  However, you might also consider 10 roses to indicate they are perfect, or 7 roses to capture the spirituality and perfection associated with this number.

There are four places to buy flowers in Wayland. The bouquets sold at Stop & Shop and Donelan’s are probably imported as prewrapped bouquets. Those sold at Russell’s and by Jolene at Post Road Flowers are assembled from individual stems.

Wayland Wednesday Flower: Pink Roses

Pink Roses (genus Rosa – probably Hybrid tea) from Stop & Shop at Wayland Town Center. Although there is a huge variety of roses, the Hybrid Tea rose remains the standard rose of the floral industry. A pink rose is often given as a token of admiration or appreciation or even an expression of sympathy. The number of roses matter as well. A single rose typically symbolizes a “simple thank” you; whereas, thirteen roses signify a secret admirer.

There are four places to buy roses in Wayland. Can you name all four? We will highlight different rose colors and the places to buy them in the coming two Wednesdays we have before Valentines day. Return here every week to warm up to a picture of flowers from somewhere in Wayland. Perhaps learn a bit about flowers, and different places in Wayland.

All Wayland Wednesday Flower posts are online here.

Submitted by Duane Galbi