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Update from the Town of Wayland on EEE Spraying

Update on EEE spraying in Wayland 091619

We would like to update you regarding the Town of Wayland’s risk mitigation plan for the mosquito borne Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE) virus. The MDPH and Massachusetts Department of Agriculture Resources completed aerial spraying in Wayland as of September 15th.

Beginning, at dusk today, Monday September 16th through the 20th dependent on weather, the Town has arranged for The East Middlesex Mosquito Control Project, a Massachusetts Trust Agency, to treat Wayland’s public roads via truck mounted spraying with Anvil 10+10 ULV, the same pesticide being used by the State. East Middlesex will also treat vegetated perimeter areas of playing fields via manual backpack spraying using the pesticide Mavrik Perimeter; those areas include Alpine, Town Building, Cochituate, Riverview and the Hannah Williams Playground, as well as the perimeter of fields/playgrounds at each of our five schools and The Children’s Way Preschool. Manual backpack spraying targets the perimeter areas of vegetation and wooded areas that surround the fields/playgrounds. Spraying onto fields and playgrounds will not be performed as mosquitoes do not reside in these open areas. There is no need for special precautions to be taken following spraying. However, we caution people to remain indoors during the evening/night when spraying is taking place. The field and school areas have been posted and will be posted for 72 hours after the treatments. Information about the products used can be found on the Town website.

Spraying will reduce the mosquito populations, and help reduce the risk of disease however, it does not eliminate the risk. The most effective way for individuals to reduce their risk of mosquito bites (and therefore exposure to EEE infected mosquitos) is to wear protective clothing and apply insect repellent at all times when outdoors, until there is a hard frost.

Avoid mosquito bites and check your yard:

During any outdoor activities, wear long sleeves, pants and socks. Insect repellent with DEET should be applied outdoors according to the product label. Applications vary by product but we encourage you to wear the product that requires the least amount of applications throughout the day. If participating in outdoor physical activities or if the weather is warm/hot additional applications may be required. Check your yard for items that may hold standing water and empty them out, take measures to prevent untreated pools from becoming a mosquito breeding area.

We advise that you limit or eliminate all outdoor activities between 6pm and 8am. These are times when the mosquito population is highest and most active and being indoors helps to reduce the risk of mosquito bites. Avoid areas where mosquitoes are abundant such as wooded places, wet areas, or areas with still water until after the first hard frost.

Additional information regarding the EEE risk in Wayland, the products being used in the spraying, and personal protection measures against mosquito bites can be found on the Town Health Department website at www.wayland.ma.us/health-department

State epidemiologist answers residents’ questions about EEE

Wayland Town Crier 9/15/19: State epidemiologist answers residents’ questions about EEE.

Important update on EEE spraying in Wayland (updated Sept 12, 6:13pm)

Sept 13 Update: Important update on EEE spraying in Wayland 091319

Aerial spraying was done in North Wayland last night and a section (triangle shaped) that extended near the Mass Pike. The state map shows areas that were sprayed last night.  https://massnrc.org/spray-map/ Aerial spraying depends largely on weather conditions including; cloud cover, air temperatures, wind, etc.  Aerial spraying is planned to hopefully continue this evening but may be delayed due to the weather conditions and cool temperatures,  if it is done it may continue for the next few days to complete the planned areas of the commonwealth.  Maps that show planned areas of aerial spraying and completed areas are on the state website and are updated as soon possible after each evening’s application.  As a community we must wait until aerial spraying is completed in Wayland and then we can begin with spraying through East Middlesex Mosquito Control Project via truck mounted and back pack perimeter spray 24 hours after.  This website will be updated regularly as new information is received.  We encourage people to check the town health department website www.wayland.ma.us/health-department that will be updated regularly with new information on EEE spraying.

Sept 12 Update: Important update on EEE spraying in Wayland 091219

Aerial spraying was not done in Wayland last night. The state map shows that none of the East Middlesex Mosquito Control District was sprayed last night.  https://massnrc.org/spray-map/ Aerial spraying depends largely on weather conditions including; cloud cover, air temperatures, wind, etc.  Aerial spraying is planned to hopefully continue this evening but may be delayed due to the weather conditions and cool temperatures,  if it is done it may continue for the next 4 days or more to complete the planned areas of the commonwealth.  Maps that show planned areas of aerial spraying and completed areas are on the state website and are updated as soon possible after each evening’s application.  As a community we need to wait until aerial spraying is completed in Wayland and then we can begin with spraying through East Middlesex Mosquito Control Project via truck mounted and back pack perimeter spray 24 hours after.  This website will be updated regularly as new information is received.

For more information on EEE spraying please see the town health department website www.wayland.ma.us/health-department that will be updated regularly.

Sept 11 Update:

Due to weather conditions aerial spraying by the state was delayed last night and only a very small area of North Wayland was sprayed.  Depending on weather conditions,  aerial spraying is planned to continue this evening and for the next 5 or 6 days to complete the planned areas.  We are told Wayland is planned to be sprayed tonight but we will not know for sure until tomorrow, due to weather conditions and other factors that can cause delays.  Maps that show planned areas of aerial spraying and completed areas are on the state website (online here: https://massnrc.org/spray-map/MidWorNorSept2019.htm) and are updated as soon possible after each evening’s application.

Once aerial spraying is completed for Wayland we must wait 24 hours and then we can move forward with our local plans for  mosquito control via truck mounted and back pack perimeter spray.

For more information and maps that show expected spray areas and completed spray areas please go to the Health Department website; www.wayland.ma.us/health-department

Submitted by:

Julia Junghanns, R.S., C.H.O.

Director of Public Health

URGENT update for the Town of Wayland: Mosquito Control for Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE) virus

Aerial Spraying for mosquitoes by MDPH and MDAR

The State Department of Public Health and Massachusetts Department of Agriculture Resources announced this morning that they will conduct aerial spraying to control mosquitoes beginning September 10th through the 15th  (weather permitting).  They will use the product Anvil 10+10 ULV.  Areas in Wayland may be covered by aerial spraying as soon as this evening at from 7:15 pm to 4:30 am.  Recent press releases from MDPH can be found on the town website.   There is no need for special precautions to be taken following spraying although we caution people to remain indoors with their windows closed during the evening/night when spraying is taking place.

Eastern Equine Encephalitis virus risk

Mosquito-borne illness and infected mosquitoes continue to be reported from MDPH and on Friday September 6th we were advised of a confirmed human case in a Sudbury youth.  Sudbury’s risk level for EEE as designated by MDPH has been raised to critical and Wayland was raised to high.  Our local mitigation efforts are in response to the continual spreading of EEE through the commonwealth including Middlesex County.  The Town and Board of Health are following the guidelines in the Massachusetts Department of Public Health (MDPH) 2019 Arbovirus Surveillance and Response Plan which includes recommendations for a response to include adulticide to achieve mosquito vector control during times of high risk for EEE.  We have chosen to restrict field use/outdoor activities with more conservative time constraints of no field activity between 6pm and 8am and strongly recommend that no outdoor gatherings take place between these hours.

This situation should be taken very seriously.   Eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) is an extremely rare but serious and often fatal infection that causes encephalitis or inflammation of the brain. It is spread by the bite of a mosquito infected with EEE virus and can also infect a wide range of animals including mammals, birds, reptiles, and amphibians. The spread of EEEV to mammals (including humans and horses) occurs through the bite of infected mosquitoes that feed on both birds and mammals.

Local Risk mitigation plan for Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE) virus

Our risk mitigation plan for EEE has been comprehensively developed over the past 24 hours by key town officials that include; Health Department and Board of Health representatives, the School Superintendent, School Department and School Committee representatives, the Town Administrator and Selectmen representatives, and East Middlesex Mosquito Control Project. Last evening during the Selectmen’s and School Committee’s Meeting, as recommended by the Health Director and Town Administrator, a vote was taken to suspend the schools Integrated Pest Management (IPM) program and allow for spraying of school and town property with pesticides to decrease the population of mosquitos and help reduce the risk of EEE in Wayland. Our plan also includes truck mounted spraying of town roads.  These are important and necessary measures to protect public health due to Wayland being at high risk for EEE virus.  Due to many areas of trees in Town that will not likely get the full benefit of the aerial spraying done by the state, we feel that it is still very important to move forward with our own Town plan to reduce mosquito populations.

Information on Town efforts.

At dusk on beginning on Wednesday September 11, 2019 our contracted partner The East Middlesex Mosquito Control Project will treat Wayland’s roads via truck mounted spraying with Anvil 10+10 ULV(weather permitting).  They will also treat vegetated perimeter areas of Town playing fields via manual backpack spraying method using the pesticide Mavrik Perimeter spray; those areas include Alpine, Town Building, Cochituate, and Riverview fields and the Hannah Williams Playground, as well as the perimeter of fields/playgrounds at each of our five schools and The Children’s Way Preschool. The manual backpack spraying method specifically targets the perimeter areas of vegetation and wood areas that surround the fields/playgrounds. Spraying onto fields and playgrounds will not be performed as mosquitoes do not reside in these open areas.  The target areas of spraying do not cause special precautions to be taken other than personal responsibility to not be outside when the spraying occurs.

Using the Ultra Low Volume sprayer to apply Anvil 10+10 isn’t expected to cause negative environmental impacts. This product and method has been used by many people for many years with minimal reports of adverse effects. They avoid spraying around water and spray after sunset to avoid bees. There are two employees in each truck to assist with watching for people and when people are seen, the spray is turned off. The passenger helps navigate so the driver can concentrate on driving and watching out for people. Less than one tablespoon of the active product, Sumithrin, is applied per acre. Also, less than one tablespoon of the synergist, pipernoyl butoxide, is applied per acre.  Its designed to kill something the size of a mosquito, besides honeybees, larger insects are not affected. Spraying after sunset minimizes honeybee exposure. The state used Anvil 10+10 during the aerial applications in 2012 and 2019. No bee mortality was reported. The Massachusetts Department of Agriculture works closely with beekeepers to make sure our methods don’t harm their hives.

The areas treated using Mavrik perimeter spray will be posted before spraying begins and for 72 hours after the treatments are completed (which may take up to 5 days depending on weather and progress).  The perimeter spray is not considered toxic to individuals or bees, as they are not outside their hive pollinating during the time frame when spraying occurs.  Once the vegetation dries from the spray after dawn, contact with the vegetation is not considered harmful.

During the day

Adult mosquito spraying helps control mosquito populations but does not eliminate the risk of disease.  The most effective way to reduce the risk of mosquito bites (and therefore exposure to EEE infected mosquitoes) is to protect the skin from mosquito bites at all times and avoid areas where mosquitoes are abundant.  Wear clothes that protect skin from mosquito bites at all times; clothes should be worn that include long sleeves, pants and socks.  Apply mosquito repellent with DEET as per instructions on the product label(repellent should be used during the day also). We encourage parents to utilize lasting mosquito repellent on their children to reduce the number of applications needed during the school day. For students who are participating in outdoor physical activity or if the weather is warm/hot, additional repellent may be needed if product labels indicate. All mosquito repellent application should occur in an outdoor setting prior to activities with a product provided from home.  Other at risk populations, including our seniors should be made aware and efforts should be diligent with precautions to prevent mosquito bites.

Questions about school recess

Parents should ensure that kids have mosquito repellent applied before school, and should send repellent and/or bug spray wipes to school with their children.  Students should stay away from the woods or where there is vegetation or standing ponds at recess or other classroom activities. Each school will identify which areas make up these areas and notify students/families and staff. School staff will monitor these areas when students are outside. When kids are at recess they are not to go near areas where there are mosquitoes; buggy areas such as the woods or adjacent vegetated areas.

Use of fields/outdoor sports and other outdoor activities

We encourage families who have children who participate in outdoor sports to have mosquito repellent available to their child from home. Application of mosquito repellent should occur outdoors and prior to the start of activity. Review product label to determine frequency of application needed when performing sweat producing activities.

We are advising that all field activities cease between 6pm and 8am.  All residents should seriously consider staying indoors from 6pm to 8am as well. We recommend all outdoor evening activities/events to be rescheduled to the daytime hours, when there are fewer mosquitoes around. This will continue until after a hard frost and a reevaluation of the situation takes place.  

Traveling outdoors and outside of town

Residents are advised to use safety precautions and be cognizant of where they are traveling within the commonwealth.  EEE virus risk continues to spread, the risk levels are changing regularly, and the risk remains with us until after the first hard frost.  People can greatly reduce their risk by protecting themselves from mosquito bites and using common sense.  When venturing outdoors wear long sleeves, pants, socks, and use mosquito repellent as per the instructions on the label.  Don’t venture to areas outdoors that may be buggy such as; the woods, swampy or wet areas and if visiting a town that is at critical or high risk for EEE, stay indoors after 6pm or before 8am.

Additional information can be found on the Health Department website:www.wayland.ma.us/health-department

Wayland’s EEE Risk level raised to High

Boston Globe 9/6/19 Two more human cases of EEE confirmed by state health officials; 7 people have contracted virusState officials have confirmed two more human cases of EEE, bringing this year’s tally to seven, according to the Department of Public Health. The DPH confirmed the news in a statement ahead of a scheduled 4:15 p.m. presser. Laboratory testing has “confirmed two new cases of Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE) virus infection, a woman in her 60s from eastern Worcester County and a female under the age of 18 from southwestern Middlesex County,” the release said. “This brings the total number of human cases of EEE to seven this year in Massachusetts. As a result, the risk level in Framingham, Marlborough, Northborough, and Sudbury has been raised to critical and the risk level in Berlin, Boylston, Hudson, Maynard, Stow, and Wayland has been raised to high.”

[ed note: Mass Dept of Health has posted this map of EEE risk]

NECN 9/6/19: As More People Test Positive for EEE, 5-Year-Old Sudbury Girl in Critical Condition. A 5-year-old girl in Sudbury, Massachusetts, is in critical condition after testing positive for eastern equine encephalitis, or EEE, town officials said Friday, after state health officials announced that two more people have contracted the rare and potentially deadly virus.

 

September 6, 2019: An URGENT update from the Health Department on EEE risk in Wayland

Due to high risk for EEE designation, all Wayland public fields outdoor activities, including sports practices, should end at 6 p.m. until 8 a.m., all other non-school outdoor activities or events should follow this guidance. As of 9/06/19, the Massachusetts Department of Public Health (MDPH) raised the risk level for Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE) virus infection in Wayland to HIGH. This is due to 2 additional cases of EEE virus infection, a woman in her 60’s from eastern Worcester County and a female under the age of 18 from southwestern Middlesex County. This brings the total number of human cases of EEE to seven this year in Massachusetts. Risk levels in Framingham, Marlborough, Northborough, and Sudbury have been raised to critical and the risk level in Berlin, Boylston, Hudson, Maynard, Stow and Wayland has been raised to high. We are following recommendations from the MDPH 2019 Arbovirus response plan and have increased mosquito surveillance for EEE virus in Wayland. We are also working on a plan for adult mosquito spraying in Wayland.

Residents should be aware that there are many communities in Massachusetts at high and critical risk for EEE. These risk levels are changing almost daily, so if you travel outside of Wayland to an adjacent community, you should check the local Health Department website for information on these towns and be aware of the risk of EEE. If a community is at high or critical risk you should consider staying indoors during the dusk to dawn hours to reduce exposure to mosquitoes. The state has conducted helicopter spraying in certain identified towns to control mosquito-borne illness for EEE and reduce mosquito populations, however this does not eliminate the risk of EEE transmission. We strongly advise the public to protect yourself from mosquito bites and prevent your yard from becoming a breeding ground. The peak time for transmission of mosquito-borne illness extends through September here in Massachusetts.

“Even though temperatures have cooled off, it is not unusual to see human EEE cases confirmed in September,” said Public Health Commissioner Monica Bharel, MD, MPH. “This is why we continue to urge the public to take seriously the threat that mosquitos can pose and to take steps to avoid being bitten.” Please visit the Health Department website to view the full press release received 09/06/19.

All residents throughout the Commonwealth should continue to use mosquito repellent and those in high and critical risk communities should consider staying indoors during the dusk to dawn hours to reduce exposure to mosquitoes. Residents can learn more about EEE and about ways to protect themselves on DPH’s website.

Information on risk levels in communities and updates from MDPH can be found on the Health Department website: https://www.wayland.ma.us/health-department/news/due-high-risk-eee-designation-all-wayland-public- fields-outdoor-activities

Protecting yourself from mosquito bites and preventing mosquito breeding in your yard

Warm weather will continue through the next couple of weeks (or longer) and there will continue to be mosquito breeding and activity in the area. Please check your yards for items that can collect water and harbor mosquito breeding. As outlined further below in this memo we have provided recommendations for avoiding mosquito bites (which can lead to mosquito-borne illness) and how to prevent your yard from becoming a mosquito breeding area.

Catch basins have been treated for mosquitoes

The catch basins in town have been treated with Fourstar 90 day Briquets. This product has 1% Bti and 6% Bsph (Bacillus shpaericus). The product is supplied by the Wayland Board of Health and distributed by the East Middlesex Mosquito Control Project. This treatment is done every year to control mosquito larvae to reduce mosquito-borne illness. Fourstar is a larvicide in a briquet form that disrupts the normal growth pattern of immature mosquitoes in water and prevents them from becoming breeding, biting adults. This product is a long-term (up to 90 days), cost-effective and environmentally responsible mosquito control larvicide.

The treated catch basins have been marked with a white dot. The Town of Wayland contracts the services of the East Middlesex Mosquito Control Project for mosquito control including helicopter spraying using BTI larvicide in the spring and catch basin treatments in the early summer. Our program during mosquito season also includes mosquito trapping, identifying populations and surveillance for diseases and species.

Mosquito habitats and mosquito-borne illness

The “Culex” mosquito species is common in suburban communities such as Wayland. This mosquito species prefers to breed/lay eggs in small artificial containers such as birdbaths, old tires, buckets, clogged gutters, and other standing water sources which can be found in people’s backyards and other similar areas of the suburbs (including catch basins).

Culex mosquitoes are the primary vectors of West Nile Virus. West Nile Virus (WNV) is a mosquito- carried virus that can cause illness in people ranging from a mild fever to more serious disease like encephalitis or meningitis. WNV is most commonly spread to people through the bite of an infected mosquito. The Culex species are also known as “bridge” vectors that will feed on birds and people. As the summer continues to progress, birds could be infected with West Nile Virus and the virus could be transmitted to a human when a mosquito bites a bird carrying the WNV virus and then subsequently bites a person.

The catch basin treatments using Fourstar Briquets will reduce the population of Culex mosquito larvae (and other mosquito larvae) that could be growing in catch basins (standing water environment), decreasing the risk of West Nile Virus infection in humans.

To prevent a yard from becoming a source for Culex mosquitoes and potentially invasive mosquito species, homeowners should make a thorough inspection of their property and remove, empty, cover or treat water-holding containers. During the summer, mosquito larvae can complete their development in water within a week.

Breeding habitats for mosquitoes that can carry Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE) virus do not exist in Wayland. However, EEE transmission can occur (through a “bridge vector”)when certain mammal biting mosquito species bite a bird that is ill with the virus, and after the mosquito is infected with the virus it could bite a human or animal and transmit the EEE virus. EEE risk can also occur in Wayland from an adjacent community. EEE is a rare but serious and potentially fatal disease that can affect people of all ages. EEE occurs sporadically in Massachusetts with the most recent outbreak years occurring from 2004-2006 and 2010-2012. There were 22 human cases of EEE infection during those two outbreak periods with 14 cases occurring among residents of Bristol and Plymouth counties.

What to do in your yard to prevent mosquito breeding, West Nile Virus (WNV) and other Arboviral Diseases:

  • Mosquito proof your home and drain standing water in your yard
  • Containers where mosquitoes commonly lay eggs include neglected swimming pools, water in loose-fitting pool covers or tarps, unscreened rain barrels, rimless tires, and plastic toys, flower pots, trash barrels/containers. Check rain gutters, including all fittings and drains.
  • Tires should be disposed of properly or stored inside.
  • Rubbish barrels, wheelbarrows and small boats should be covered or stored upside down.
  • The water in wading pools and birdbaths should be changed weekly.
  • Infrequently used pools should be covered or properly maintained.
  • Some mosquitoes like to come indoors. Keep them outside by having tightly-fitting screens on all of your windows and doors. Fix any holes in screens and screen doors and replace worn weather stripping.
  • Keep the grass in your yard cut short and shrubs trimmed.
  • Once a week empty and scrub, turn over, cover or throw out any items that hold water.
  • Rainwater or rain/collection barrels tips:
    • Always use a mosquito-proof screen to seal and cover the rain barrel or other water- saving container. Mosquito-proof screen is a very fine mesh, usually 1/16 of an inch. If the barrel is covered, this will reduce the likelihood of mosquitoes becoming a problem.
    • If the barrel is holding a lot of water consider mosquitofish, or consider treating with products containing Bti (always read the product label and use according to the instructions).
    • Keep the rain barrel lid and connectors sealed to help keep bugs out.
    • Be sure to always remove the water that pools at the top of the barrel at least once or twice a week.
    • If possible, place your barrel on a surface that will soak up any water that overflows so it doesn’t pool and create a mosquito habitat.
    • Regularly inspect your rain barrel system. Check for cracks or leaks. Be sure that all fittings and seals are intact and that no water accumulates on the ground around the barrel.
    • Clean the barrel on a regular basis. Drain it completely and clean it out at least twice a year.

What you should do to avoid mosquito bites

At this time of year mosquito populations are on the rise and residents should take precautions to avoid mosquito bites.

  • Be aware of peak mosquito hours:
    The hours from dusk to dawn are peak biting times for many mosquitoes. Mosquitoes are more active in damp, shady areas, during cloudy humid days, and at night. Consider rescheduling outdoor activities that occur during evening or early morning. Also, take extra care to use repellent and protective clothing.
  • There are some emerging mosquito species that are out and active during the day. Be sure to protect yourself and family members during the day also.

Wear protective clothing:

  • Clothing can help reduce mosquito bites. Although it may be difficult to do when it’s hot, wearing long-sleeves, long pants and socks when outdoors will help keep mosquitoes away from your skin.
    Cover up the arms and legs of children playing outdoors. Baby carriages and playpens should be covered with mosquito netting.

Apply insect repellent when you go outdoors.

  • Use a repellent with DEET (N, N-diethyl-m-toluamide), permethrin, picaridin (KBR 3023), IR3535 (3-[N-butyl-N-acetyl]-aminopropionic acid) or oil of lemon eucalyptus [p-menthane 3, 8-diol (PMD)].
  • DEET products should not be used on infants under two months of age and should be used in concentration of 30% or less on older children.
  • The Center for Disease Control has recently listed Oil of lemon eucalyptus as providing protection against mosquitoes; however, it should not be used on children under three years of age.
  • Permethrin products are intended for use on items such as clothing, shoes, bed nets and camping gear and should not be applied to the skin.
  • Protect pets and horses from mosquito bites.
  • Always follow the instructions on the label of any repellent. More information on choosing and using repellents safely is listed below.

For further information on WNV or EEE, log unto the Massachusetts Department of Public Health web site at: https://www.mass.gov/mosquito-borne-diseases

If residents have any questions about mosquitoes or how to control them: the East Middlesex Mosquito Control Project can be reached at: https://sudbury.ma.us/emmcp/

Choosing and using repellents safely: https://www.epa.gov/insect-repellents http://www.cdc.gov/westnile/faq/repellent.html

The National Pesticide Information Center (NPIC) toll free at 1-800-858-7378 or online at http://npic.orst.edu/index.html. If you can’t go online contact MDPH at (617)983-6800 for a hard copy of the fact sheet.

www.mass.gov/mosquitoesandticks

Julia Junghanns, R.S., C.H.O. Director of Public Health 9/06/19

 

August 23, 2019: An update from the Health Department on Mosquito-borne illness and  EEE risk in Wayland

As of 8/23/19, the Massachusetts Department of Public Health (MDPH) raised the risk level for Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE) in Wayland to “moderate”.  This risk is very unusual for Wayland as we are usually concerned with West Nile Virus due to the type of habitat and areas of mosquito breeding in town.  This new risk of EEE in Wayland and in new areas of the Commonwealth is due to increased mosquito-borne illness of EEE and surveillance results in Middlesex County and adjacent areas of the state.  We are following recommendations from the MDPH 2019 Arbovirus response plan and have increased mosquito surveillance for EEE virus in Wayland.  Test results from mosquito samples taken this week show that ALL mosquito pools in the East Middlesex District tested negative for EEE and WNV.  Mosquitoes were collected and tested from Lincoln, Weston, Wayland, Framingham, Reading, North Reading, Sudbury and Concord. The Wellesley trap didn’t catch enough to submit. In addition to no disease present, the traps also showed low mosquito populations, Wayland was especially low.  Mosquito surveillance for EEE in Wayland will continue next week.  If MDPH raises the risk to “high”, we will discuss canceling or altering outdoor events.

[ed note: Mass Dept of Health has posted this map of EEE risk]

Residents should be aware that there are many communities in Massachusetts at high and critical risk for EEE.  These risk levels are changing almost daily, so if you travel outside of Wayland to an adjacent community, you should check the Health Department website for information on these towns and be aware of the risk of EEE.  If a community is at high or critical risk you should consider staying indoors during the dusk to dawn hours to reduce exposure to mosquitoes. The state will be conducting helicopter spraying in certain identified towns to control mosquito-borne illness for EEE and reduce mosquito populations, however this does not eliminate the risk of EEE transmission.  Wayland has not been identified for mosquito spraying at this time.  We strongly advise the public to protect yourself from mosquito bites and prevent your yard from becoming a breeding ground. 

Information on risk levels in communities and updates from MDPH can be found on the Health Department website: https://www.wayland.ma.us/health-department/news/important-information-about-mosquito-borne-illness-updated-82919

“As we head into the Labor Day weekend and the month of September people should not forget to bring and use an EPA-approved mosquito repellent for any outdoor activities,” said Public Health Commissioner Monica Bharel, MD, MPH. “The peak time for transmission of mosquito-borne illness extends through September here in Massachusetts.”  All residents should continue to use mosquito repellent and those in high and critical risk communities should consider staying indoors during the dusk to dawn hours to reduce exposure to mosquitoes.  This press release dated 8/29/19 can be viewed on the Health Department website. 

Protecting yourself from mosquito bites and preventing mosquito breeding in your yard

Warm weather will continue through the next couple of weeks (or longer) and there will continue to be mosquito breeding and activity in the area.    Please check your yards for items that can collect water and harbor mosquito breeding.  As outlined further below in this memo we have provided recommendations for avoiding mosquito bites (which can lead to mosquito-borne illness) and how to prevent your yard from becoming a mosquito breeding area.

Catch basins have been treated for mosquitoes

The catch basins in town have been treated with Fourstar 90 day Briquets. This product has 1% Bti and 6% Bsph (Bacillus shpaericus).  The product is supplied by the Wayland Board of Health and distributed by the East Middlesex Mosquito Control Project.  This treatment is done every year to control mosquito larvae to reduce mosquito-borne illness.  Fourstar is a larvicide in a briquet form that disrupts the normal growth pattern of immature mosquitoes in water and prevents them from becoming breeding, biting adults.  This product is a long-term (up to 90 days), cost-effective and environmentally responsible mosquito control larvicide.

The treated catch basins have been marked with a white dot.  The Town of Wayland contracts the services of the East Middlesex Mosquito Control Project for mosquito control including helicopter spraying using BTI larvicide in the spring and catch basin treatments in the early summer.  Our program during mosquito season also includes mosquito trapping, identifying populations and surveillance for diseases and species.

Mosquito habitats and mosquito-borne illness

The “Culex” mosquito species is common in suburban communities such as Wayland.  This mosquito species prefers to breed/lay eggs in small artificial containers such as birdbaths, old tires, buckets, clogged gutters, and other standing water sources which can be found in people’s backyards and other similar areas of the suburbs (including catch basins).

Culex mosquitoes are the primary vectors of West Nile Virus.  West Nile Virus (WNV) is a mosquito-carried virus that can cause illness in people ranging from a mild fever to more serious disease like encephalitis or meningitis.  WNV is most commonly spread to people through the bite of an infected mosquito.  The Culex species are also known as “bridge” vectors that will feed on birds and people.  As the summer continues to progress, birds could be infected with West Nile Virus and the virus could be transmitted to a human when a mosquito bites a bird carrying the WNV virus and then subsequently bites a person.

The catch basin treatments using Fourstar Briquets will reduce the population of Culex mosquito larvae (and other mosquito larvae) that could be growing in catch basins (standing water environment), decreasing the risk of West Nile Virus infection in humans.

To prevent a yard from becoming a source for Culex mosquitoes and potentially invasive mosquito species, homeowners should make a thorough inspection of their property and remove, empty, cover or treat water-holding containers.  During the summer, mosquito larvae can complete their development in water within a week.

Breeding habitats for mosquitoes that can carry Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE) do not exist in Wayland.  However, EEE transmission can occur (through a “bridge vector”)when certain mammal biting mosquito species bite a bird that is ill with the virus, and after the mosquito is infected with the virus it could bite a human or animal and transmit the EEE virus.  EEE risk can occur in Wayland from an adjacent community.  EEE is a rare but serious and potentially fatal disease that can affect people of all ages. EEE occurs sporadically in Massachusetts with the most recent outbreak years occurring from 2004-2006 and 2010-2012. There were 22 human cases of EEE infection during those two outbreak periods with 14 cases occurring among residents of Bristol and Plymouth counties.

What to do in your yard to prevent mosquito breeding, West Nile Virus (WNV) and other Arboviral Diseases:

  • Mosquito proof your home and drain standing water in your yard
  • Containers where mosquitoes commonly lay eggs include neglected swimming pools, water in loose-fitting pool covers or tarps, unscreened rain barrels, rimless tires, and plastic toys, flower pots, trash barrels/containers. Check rain gutters, including all fittings and drains.
  • Tires should be disposed of properly or stored inside.
  • Rubbish barrels, wheelbarrows and small boats should be covered or stored upside down.
  • The water in wading pools and birdbaths should be changed weekly.
  • Infrequently used pools should be covered or properly maintained.
  • Some mosquitoes like to come indoors. Keep them outside by having tightly-fitting screens on all of your windows and doors. Fix any holes in screens and screen doors and replace worn weather stripping.
  • Keep the grass in your yard cut short and shrubs trimmed.
  • Once a week empty and scrub, turn over, cover or throw out any items that hold water.
  • Rainwater or rain/collection barrels tips:
    • Always use a mosquito-proof screen to seal and cover the rain barrel or other water-saving container. Mosquito-proof screen is a very fine mesh, usually 1/16 of an inch.  If the barrel is covered, this will reduce the likelihood of mosquitoes becoming a problem.
    • If the barrel is holding a lot of water consider mosquitofish, or consider treating with products containing Bti (always read the product label and use according to the instructions).
    • Keep the rain barrel lid and connectors sealed to help keep bugs out.
    • Be sure to always remove the water that pools at the top of the barrel at least once or twice a week.
    • If possible, place your barrel on a surface that will soak up any water that overflows so it doesn’t pool and create a mosquito habitat.
    • Regularly inspect your rain barrel system. Check for cracks or leaks.  Be sure that all fittings and seals are intact and that no water accumulates on the ground around the barrel.
    • Clean the barrel on a regular basis. Drain it completely and clean it out at least twice a year.

What you should do to avoid mosquito bites

At this time of year mosquito populations are on the rise and residents should take precautions to avoid mosquito bites.

Be aware of peak mosquito hours:

  • The hours from dusk to dawn are peak biting times for many mosquitoes. Mosquitoes are more active in damp, shady areas, during cloudy humid days, and at night. Consider rescheduling outdoor activities that occur during evening or early morning. Also, take extra care to use repellent and protective clothing.
  • There are some emerging mosquito species that are out and active during the day. Be sure to protect yourself and family members during the day also.

Wear protective clothing:

  • Clothing can help reduce mosquito bites. Although it may be difficult to do when it’s hot, wearing long-sleeves, long pants and socks when outdoors will help keep mosquitoes away from your skin.
  • Cover up the arms and legs of children playing outdoors. Baby carriages and playpens should be covered with mosquito netting.

Apply insect repellent when you go outdoors.

  • Use a repellent with DEET (N, N-diethyl-m-toluamide), permethrin, picaridin (KBR 3023), IR3535 (3-[N-butyl-N-acetyl]-aminopropionic acid) or oil of lemon eucalyptus [p-menthane 3, 8-diol (PMD)].
  • DEET products should not be used on infants under two months of age and should be used in concentration of 30% or less on older children.
  • The Center for Disease Control has recently listed Oil of lemon eucalyptus as providing protection against mosquitoes; however, it should not be used on children under three years of age.
  • Permethrin products are intended for use on items such as clothing, shoes, bed nets and camping gear and should not be applied to the skin.
  • Protect pets and horses from mosquito bites.
  • Always follow the instructions on the label of any repellent. More information on choosing and using repellents safely is listed below.

For further information on WNV or EEE, log unto the Massachusetts Department of Public Health web site at: https://www.mass.gov/mosquito-borne-diseases

If residents have any questions about mosquitoes or how to control them: the East Middlesex Mosquito Control Project can be reached at: https://sudbury.ma.us/emmcp/

Choosing and using repellents safely:

The National Pesticide Information Center (NPIC) toll free at 1-800-858-7378 or online at http://npic.orst.edu/index.html.  If you can’t go online contact MDPH at (617)983-6800 for a hard copy of the fact sheet. www.mass.gov/mosquitoesandticks

Julia Junghanns, R.S., C.H.O.
Director of Public Health
08/29/19

Mosquito tests positive for West Nile Virus in Wayland: Residents should take precautions to avoid mosquito bites

The following was submitted by the the Town’s Health Director, Julia Junghanns:

On August 22, 2013 we were notified by the State DPH that a mosquito obtained from Wayland tested positive for WNV. Residents should be aware that this is not unusual for this time of year. The mosquito was obtained from a testing pool in the South quadrant of town, it was collected on 8/14/13 and it was a Culex Pipiens species. I spoke to Dave Henley Superintendent of EMMCP and we don’t know for sure which trap it was collected from yet.

A conference call was held by State DPH for local Boards of Health on August 23, 2013 to provide an update on West Nile virus and Eastern Equine Encephalitis activity in Massachusetts. Updates from the state will be coming into our office on a regular basis but at this time the town of Wayland is considered a low risk area for mosquito-borne illness. We will be continuing to monitor the risk level of our district and adjacent communities as well as other indicators and speaking with Dave Henley Superintendent of EMMCP to determine if there is a need for adult truck mounted spraying.

Due to the hot and rainy conditions this summer, mosquito populations are abundant and there are many areas of standing water in people’s yards that should be drained. The Board of Health recommends that residents should avoid getting mosquito bites, mosquito proof their homes and drain standing water. See instructions below on how to mosquito proof your home and drain standing water in your yard. In Wayland, mosquitoes pose a health threat especially for West Nile Virus (WNV) typically between now and early October, or the first frost.

Residents should be aware that mosquito-borne viruses such as WNV, or EEE could cause fever, meningitis or encephalitis. Early symptoms of these diseases include fever, headache, stiff neck and muscle weakness. Mosquitoes acquire WNV or EEE after biting an infected bird. Those mosquitoes can then transmit that virus to a person, horse or to another bird. Culex mosquitoes that develop in water holding containers are the primary vectors of WNV, while the mosquitoes that transmit EEE originate in wetlands.

There are certain actions that residents should take related to West Nile Virus (WNV).
Mosquito proof your home and drain standing water

  • To prevent a yard from becoming a source for Culex mosquitoes, homeowners should make a thorough inspection of their property and remove, empty, cover or treat any water-holding containers. During the summer, mosquito larvae can complete their development in water within a week.
  • Keep grass cut short and trim shrubs to eliminate hiding places for mosquitoes. Don’t allow grass clippings and debris to clog street gutters: these are prime breeding sites.
  • Containers where mosquitoes commonly lay eggs include neglected swimming pools, water in loose fitting pool covers or tarps, unscreened rain barrels, rimless tires, and plastic toys. Check rain gutters and drains.
  • Tires should be disposed of properly or stored inside.
  • Rubbish barrels, wheelbarrows and small boats should be covered or stored upside down.
  • The water in wading pools and birdbaths should be changed weekly.
  • Infrequently used pools should be covered or properly maintained.
  • Rainwater collection barrels should be screened, emptied once a week or treated with products containing Bti.
  • Some mosquitoes like to come indoors. Keep them outside by having tightly-fitting screens on all of your windows and doors. Fix any holes in screens and screen doors and replace worn weather stripping.

What you should do to avoid mosquito bites:

  • Be aware of peak mosquito hours- The hours from dusk to dawn are peak biting times for many mosquitoes. Mosquitoes are more active in damp, shady areas, during cloudy humid days, and at night. Consider rescheduling outdoor activities that occur during evening or early morning. Also, take extra care to use repellent and protective clothing.
  • Clothing Can Help reduce mosquito bites. Although it may be difficult to do when it’s hot, wearing long-sleeves, long pants and socks when outdoors will help keep mosquitoes away from your skin.
  • Apply insect repellent when you go outdoors. Use a repellent with DEET (N, N-diethyl-m-toluamide), permethrin, picaridin (KBR 3023), IR3535 (3-[N-butyl-N-acetyl]-aminopropionic acid)or oil of lemon eucalyptus [p-menthane 3, 8-diol (PMD)], use according to the instructions on the product label.
  • DEET products should not be used on infants under two months of age and should be used in concentration of 30% or less on older children.
  • Oil of lemon eucalyptus should not be used on children under three years of age.
  • Permethrin products are intended for use on items such as clothing, shoes, bed nets and camping gear and should not be applied to the skin.
  • More information on choosing and using repellents safely is included in the MDPH Mosquito Repellents fact sheet which can be viewed online at www.mass.gov/dph/wnv, and also the CDC http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvbid/westnile/RepellentUpdates.htm, or National Pesticide Information Center (NPIC) toll free at 1-800-858-7378 or online at http://npic.orst.edu/index.html. If you can’t go online contact MDPH at (617)983-6800 for a hard copy of the fact sheet.
  • Cover up the arms and legs of children playing outdoors. Baby carriages and playpens should be covered with mosquito netting.

For further information on WNV or EEE, log unto the Massachusetts Department of Public Health web site at www.mass.gov/dph/wnv or the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention online here. If residents have any questions about mosquitoes or how to control them, contact the East Middlesex Mosquito Control Project at 781-899-5730 or visit http://sudbury.ma.us/services/health/emmcp/.

 

Wayland Patch 8/22/13: Wayland Mosquito Pool Tests Positive for West Nile. The State Department of Public Health has announced that a sample collected Aug. 14 from a Wayland mosquito pool has tested positive for West Nile Virus.

How Do I Exclude My Property from Mosquito Spraying?

Wayland Patch 6/7/13: How Do I Exclude My Property from Mosquito Spraying? The Wayland Board of Health has traditionally conducted mosquito control at the larvae level by treating Wayland’s marshy areas with an anti-larval. This year, however, the board has decided to conduct some spraying for adult mosquito control as well due to the increased occurrence of West Nile Virus, Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE) and mosquito-borne illness overall in the state last year, according to a press release from the board. Additionally, larviciding restrictions in areas of Great Meadows Wildlife Refuge also contributed to the decision.